Braxton Hicks Contractions

Braxon Hicks contractions during pregnancy. Can they harm me and my child? Are they normal?

Braxton Hicks Contractions

How they got their name

Braxton Hicks contractions got their name way back in 1872. An English doctor by the name of John Braxton Hicks termed the contractions that women experience before going into actual labor.

They are labeled as labor practice

Braxton Hicks contractions will appear as early as the second trimester of your pregnancy. But, they are most commonly noticed in your third trimester. They are called labor practice because your uterine muscles will tighten up for sometimes 2 minutes before they relax again.

The causes of Braxton Hicks contractions

Medical professionals are not completely sure what exactly does cause these contractions, but, they all agree that they are important for toning the muscles of your uterus and keeping the blood flowing to your placenta. The Braxton Hicks contractions are not associated with the dilation of the cervix during labor, but are said to play a part in softening the cervix.

Situations that bring about Braxton Hicks contractions

Stopping the Braxton Hicks contractions

If you do not feel any relief from these contractions, contact your doctor

The difference between Braxton Hicks contractions and true labor

Below is listed some properties of Braxton Hicks contractions. True labor will be just the opposite of these properties. With Braxton Hicks contractions:

Braxton Hicks contractions are said to be annoying at most, but none the less, they do play an important roll in getting your body ready for labor and delivery of your precious miracle. So hang in there, it won't be long, now.

Once you hold that little angel in your arms, it will be so easy to say that it was all so worth it.